Wild Clouds: The London-based Sustainable Loungewear Brand.

Launched last year by Franny Collingham (in the Summer of 2021), Wild Clouds are a London-based, ethical, sustainable fashion brand (specialising in loungewear).

The label makes timeless, unisex clothing that creates a sense of wellbeing from one season to the next. The pieces are ethically made in the UK (using the most sustainable materials that Franny could find).

The garments are designed to be versatile: from lounging at home, to wearing out of the house, to travelling, – the designs feature weird and wonderful prints (inspired by fantasy and nature).

Franny’s pieces are made in small batches, and her supply chain is fully-traceable: the soft, signature fabric contains 76% organic cotton and 24% linen, making it breathable and light in the summer, cosy in the winter, and great for wearing all year round. The organic cotton and pure linen is grown in Europe, and the final printed fabric is Oeko-tex standard 100 certified.

The buttons are made in the UK from eco-friendly Coroza (a sustainably harvested material that supports communities in Ecuador), and the European elastic is natural and fully biodegradable at the end of its life (it’s made from organic cotton and natural rubber, which has a longer lifespan than conventional elastic). During the printing process, Franny uses reactive, AZO-free dyes.

By making their clothes in England, Wild Clouds supports local manufacturers, – minimising their carbon footprint. As well as this, the offcuts are made into accessories by a social enterprise in London that provides supportive employment opportunities for women who face barriers to employment.

Prior to launching Wild Clouds, Franny Collingham worked in the fashion industry and in the retail supply chain for over fifteen years (with a particular focus on implementing sustainable practices into supply chains in start-ups, and in developed brands). Franny launched the business, because she couldn’t find anything else on the market that ticked her boxes.

“Quite rightly, there is a lot of talk that cheap fast fashion is not the way forward, and that often, it comes at a great cost to others. However, I firmly believe that sustainable clothing should not be a luxury. It should be luxurious, inclusive, creative and hard-wearing, – without the associated price tag,” said Franny.

Find out more here: https://wildclouds.com